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CaRMS

CaRMS

The overall goal of the Ophthalmology residency program at Queen's University is to produce excellent ophthalmologists—confident medical and surgical experts, and accomplished communicators with the skills and values to be leaders within both the medical community, and the community as a whole. We are an education-focused department providing innovative, in-depth learning opportunities in a collegial atmosphere, and our extensive and varied educational programs prepare residents for success across the complete spectrum of ophthalmology. From the world of academia, to community based comprehensive practice, Queen’s graduates excel. 

Our program fosters an inclusive environment in which diverse personalities can flourish. To that end, we strive to provide a collegial atmosphere where residents can work, learn and ask questions with confidence. While we challenge our residents to reach their potential, we maintain the flexibility to allow individual strengths to thrive, and weaknesses to be addressed in a constructive manner. Queen’s residents are regarded as colleagues, integral members of our team, and the lifeblood of our academic department. 

I hope that you will take this opportunity to learn more about our program and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

Dr. Stephanie Baxter, MD, FRCSC
Postgraduate Program Director

 The Queens University Ophthalmology Residency Program consists of a 5-year curriculum. In the first year, residents rotate through a series of medical and surgical specialties with direct links to ophthalmology, such as plastic surgery, endocrinology and neuro-radiology. First year residents conclude their introductory year by attending the 6-week long TORIC course, where faculty from across Canada, including eminent teachers from our department, deliver an excellent and intensive introductory course for ophthalmology trainees. 


Residents in years 2 through 5 move through a carefully planned series of rotations, which ensures that all areas are extensively covered. The PGY-2 year consists of intensive training in emergency eye disease management; however, subspecialty training also occurs during this year. PGY-3 focuses on pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology and oculoplastics. PGY-4 focuses on intensive training in intraocular surgery, as well as continuing medical education in vitreo-retinal diseases. Finally, the focus of PGY-5 is the refinement of skills in the surgical and medical management of corneal diseases and glaucoma, as well as the fine-tuning of advanced cataract surgical skills.

Surgical education is a priority at Queen’s. Thousands of operations, covering all areas of ophthalmology, are performed in our department every year. We are extremely proud that residents are involved in virtually every procedure. Moreover, our residents have the opportunity to work one-on-one with attending surgeons over extended periods, which fosters the close relationships so vital to surgical training. As a result, our residents have tremendous opportunities to perform many procedures, and become confident in the complete range of ophthalmic surgical procedures. We also have a fully supplied surgical skills development lab and a structured skill development curriculum, which allow residents to hone their skills and enhance their progress in the operating room.

PGY1 

Obtain experience in Medicine, Surgery and Emergency Medicine. 

Obtain experience in subspecialties that have relevance to Ophthalmology. 

Attend the Clinical and Basic Science Course in Ophthalmology at the University of Toronto. 

Responsibilities of the PGY1 resident are rotation specific and are set out by the discipline through which the resident rotates. 


PGY2 

The program for the PGY2 Resident is designed to satisfy the following CanMEDS objectives: 

1. Medical Expert: develop skills in diagnosing and managing patients with general eye problems; obtain exposure to minor surgery techniques; achieve competence in harvesting, preserving and transporting eyes for corneal transplantation 

2. Communicator: develop skills in listening effectively and discussing diagnoses and management with patients and their families 

3. Collaborator: learn to consult effectively with other physicians and health care professionals and act as a team member 

4. Manager: learn to utilize time effectively and efficiently in clinic; manage the Emergency and Walk-In Clinics 

5. Health Advocate: recognize patient issues requiring advocacy (eg. eye protection in the workplace, access to low vision services) 

6. Scholar: undertake a supervised investigation project 

7. Professional: deliver the highest quality care with integrity, honesty and compassion
 
 
 
The following will be the responsibilities of the PGY2 Resident: 

1. To obtain the history and carry out the initial examination of ophthalmological patients coming to the Emergency Department of the hospital to which they are primarily assigned. 

2. To attend clinics as detailed in the schedule of activities of the Department of Ophthalmology. 

3. To obtain the history and conduct the general physical and ophthalmological examinations on all patients admitted to the Department of Ophthalmology in the hospital to which they are primarily assigned. 

4. To write orders for investigations and management on these patients in consultation with the Senior House Staff and/or Attending Staff. 

5. To write pre-operative orders on patients the evening before surgery. 

6. To attend daily ward rounds, maintain hospital records, and follow-up on clinical laboratory and radiological test results pertaining to in-hospital ophthalmology patients under the direction of the Senior Resident. 

7. To attend ophthalmological surgery as directed by the Senior Residents. 

8. To attend the teaching activities of the Department of Ophthalmology and to carry out assignments within them as directed by the Senior Resident and by members of the Attending Staff. 


PGY3 
 
In PGY-3, Residents will spend 4 months each in pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, and oculoplastics.
 
PGY4 and PGY5 

The program for the Senior Resident is designed to satisfy the following CanMEDS objectives: 

1. Medical Expert: demonstrate maturation in clinical and surgical skills, especially with regard to intra-ocular surgery and management of ocular trauma 

2. Communicator: further develop skills in listening effectively and discussing diagnoses and management with patients and their families 

3. Collaborator: consult effectively with other physicians and health care professionals and act as a team member 

4. Manager: learn to utilize time effectively and efficiently in clinic; manage the in patient service; in collaboration with the Program Director, manage resident schedules; prepare for independent professional practice 

5. Health Advocate: recognize patient issues requiring advocacy (eg. eye protection in the workplace, access to low vision services) 

6. Scholar: undertake a supervised investigation project; recognize areas of deficiency and undertake remediation 

7. Professional: deliver the highest quality care with integrity, honesty and compassion

The following will be the responsibilities of the Senior Resident: 

1. To supervise and have penultimate responsibility for the care of patients admitted. This includes the supervision of PGY2 and PGY3 residents and the conduct of regular ward rounds. The condition of all patients should be personally reviewed at the end of each day. 

2. To be available for advice and guidance to the PGY3 Residents. 

3. To participate in the regularly scheduled Ophthalmology Clinics in the affiliated teaching hospitals as detailed in the schedule of activities of the Department of Ophthalmology. 

4. To participate in ophthalmic surgery as directed by the Chiefs of Service and other members of the Attending Staff. 

5. To collaborate with consultant staff to help to maintain up-to-date lists of patients awaiting admission to the Ophthalmology Department of the affiliated hospitals and communicate with the admitting office concerning admission dates. In sequencing elective admission of patients, account is taken of medical urgency, the chronological order of patients on the waiting lists and reserved admission dates. Any difficulties in admissions or waiting lists to be communicated quickly to the attending staff man involved and appropriate Head of the hospital department. To schedule operations in the affiliated hospitals and to assign assistants. 

6. To participate in all components of the teaching program of the Department of Ophthalmology and to carry out specific assignments arranged by the Head of the Department, Deputy Heads of Service and members of the Attending Staff (e.g., Quality Assurance Review). 

7. To dictate discharge summaries on all patients admitted to the Departments of Ophthalmology from regularly scheduled Ophthalmology Clinics and the Emergency Department within seventy-two hours after their discharge from hospital. 

8. The identified Chief Resident will prepare a call schedule. A PGY4 or PGY5 resident will be available at all times for surgical coverage of emergency cases admitted to either hospital. This resident should see and assess the care preoperatively and discuss its management and deposition with the Attending Staff on-call. 

9. To teach the basic components of the ocular exam to the PGY2 Residents during July and August of each year.

Residents are required to attend a variety of academic activities on a regular basis.  These include:

  • Departmental Seminars in Ophthalmology
  • Grand Rounds and Clinical Rounds
  • Professor's Rounds
  • Journal Club
  • University of Toronto Basic Science Course (for PGY1s)
  • Wet Lab - PGY4 residents are introduced to intraocular surgery in this lab prior to exposure in the operating room.
  • Ophthalmic Pathology Seminars
  • Academic Half Days for PGY1s - residents attend on the service to which they are assigned.
  • IVFA Rounds
  • Chairman's Rounds

There are other organized scholarly activities that are recommended to residents.  These include:

  • Board Review Course for PGY5 residents
  • Basic Science Course for PGY4 residents, at either Lancaster University or Stanford University
  • Practice Management Course for senior Ophthalmology Residents
  • Wet Labs

At Queen’s we strongly believe that being at the cutting edge of medicine requires a solid grounding in research fundamentals. Each resident participates in important research projects from PGY-2 through PGY-5. Significant support - including idea generation, methodological and statistical consultation, and funding are provided. 

Residents are also provided with significant time to carry out their research (generally 10% of their time). Residents showcase their research at our annual departmental research symposium, and many also present at national and international conferences. Many Queens’ residents have been honoured with national awards for research excellence.

Developing a broad view of the world of ophthalmology is an important component of residency training. To that end, our program has been open to innovative opportunities for learning. In addition to the extensive time and support provided for Queen’s residents to attend courses outside of Kingston, our residents have the opportunity to organize elective blocks at other institutions. These are an opportunity to expand horizons, or investigate future fellowship locations. We also offer regular formalized opportunities to work in developing nations, such as Ghana and Jamaica, under the supervision of Queen’s attending physicians.

At Queen’s, we believe in providing our residents with the opportunity to learn from a broad range of sources. To that end, all of our residents are provided with generous amounts of time and funding to attend an inspiring array of the world’s best courses and conferences.  

 

Our residents usually attend meetings of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society and the American Academy of Ophthalmology.  Many conferences, workshops, and other leadership opportunities are also available at Queen's and these include:

 

QCARE

The Queen’s Conference on Academic Residency Education (QCARE) is an annual two-day conference that takes place in May for all first year residents. Attendance is mandatory, thus residents are released from service responsibilities for those two days. The vision for QCARE is to provide education on the CanMEDS non-medical expert competencies in a practical, innovative, and engaging manner. The two days include plenary speakers and smaller group workshops.

 

Kingston Resuscitation Institute

The Kingston Resuscitation Institute (KRI) hosts a Leadership Series for senior residents. The purpose of this series is to develop promising senior trainees for future leadership roles and to stimulate their interest in leadership. The series addresses some of the CanMEDS roles shared by all of our training programs that are difficult to address in the regular clinical setting, including the Physician as Communicator, Collaborator, Manager and Professional.  The KRI also hosts a Residents’ Medical Education Seminar Series that takes place over the Fall and Winter months. The purpose of the series is to engage learners with theoretical frameworks, curricula development, principles of teaching, assessment strategies, program evaluation, research, and remediation processes.



 

Chief Residents



A Chief and Senior Resident Workshop is offered in May to all residents in these leadership positions. In particular, sessions on leadership and conflict management address effective and appropriate management, administration, and leadership skills.  Chief Residents are selected residents who are full members of the Residency Program Committee (RPC). In this role, s/he is responsible for bringing the concerns of other residents to RPC meetings.